White Earth Nation

Developmental Milestones

Babies & children develop at their own pace, so it's impossible to tell exactly when yours will learn a given skill. The Developmental Milestone Checklist will give you a general idea of the changes you can expect as your child gets older, but don't be alarmed if your child takes a slightly different course. Click here for referral information!

Developmental Milestones for Ages: 3 Months, 7 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years, 5 years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developmental Milestones for Age 3 Months

□ Becomes more expressive and communicates more with face and body.
□ Begins to develop a social smile.
□ Enjoys playing with others, may cry when playing stops.
□ Imitates some movement and facial expressions.
□ Brings hands to mouth.
□ Grasps and shakes hand toys.
□ Opens and shuts hands.
□ Pushes down on legs when feet are placed on a firm surface.
□ Raises head and chest when lying on stomach.
□ Stretches legs out and kicks when lying on stomach or back.
□ Supports upper body with arms when lying on stomach.
□ Takes swipes at dangling objects with hands.
□ Begins to babble.
□ Begins to imitate some sounds.
□ Smiles at the sound of your voice.
□ Turns head toward direction of sound.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ Begins babbling, but does not try to imitate any of your sounds by 4 months.
□ Cannot support head well by 3 months.
□ Crosses eyes most of the time (occasional crossing of the eyes is normal in these first months).
□ Does not babble by 3 to 4 months.
□ Does not bring objects to mouth by 4 months.
□ Does not follow moving objects with eyes by 2 to 3 months.
□ Does not grasp and hold objects by 3 months.
□ Does not notice hands by 2 months.
□ Does not pay attention to new faces, or seems very frightened by new faces or surroundings.
□ Does not push down with legs when feet are placed on a firm surface by 4 months.
□ Does not reach for and grasp toys by 3 to 4 months.
□ Does not seem to respond to loud noises.
□ Does not smile at people by 3 months.
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had.
□ Has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directions.

 

Developmental Milestones for Age 7 Months

□ Enjoys social play.
□ Interested in mirror images.
□ Respond's to other people's expressions of emotion and appears joyful often.
□ Reaches with one hand.
□ Rolls both ways (front to back, back to front).
□ Sits with, and then without, the support of hands.
□ Supports whole weight on legs.
□ Transfers object from hand to hand.
□ Uses hand to rake object.
□ Ability to track moving objects improves.
□ Develops full color vision.
□ Distance vision matures.
□ Explores with hands and mouth.
□ Finds partially hidden objects.
□ Struggles to get objects out of reach.
□ Babbles chains of sounds.
□ Begins to respond to "No".
□ Can tell emotions by tone of voice.
□ Responds to own name.
□ Responds to sounds by making sounds.
□ Uses voice to express joy and displeasure.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ Cannot sit with help by 6 months.
□ Does not actively reach for objects by 6 to 7 months.
□ Does not babble by 8 months.
□ Does not bear weight on legs by 7 months.
□ Does not follow objects with both eyes at near (1 foot) and far (6 feet) ranges by 7 months.
□ Does not laugh or make squealing sounds by 6 months.
□ Does not respond to sounds around him or her.
□ Does not roll over in either direction (front to back or back to front) by 5 months.
□ Does not smile on his or her own by 5 months.
□ Does not try to attract attention through actions by 7 months.
□ Does not turn head to locate sounds by 4 months.
□ Doesn’t seem to enjoy being around people.
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had.
□ Has difficulty getting objects to mouth.
□ Head still flops back when body is pulled to a sitting position.
□ One or both eyes consistently turn in or out.
□ Persistent tearing, eye drainage, or sensitivity to light.
□ Reaches with one hand only.
□ Refuses to cuddle.
□ Seems impossible to comfort at night after 5 months.
□ Seems very floppy, like a rag doll.
□ Seems very stiff, with tight muscles.
□ Shows no affection for the person who cares for him or her.
□ Shows no interest in games of peek-a-boo by 8 months.

 

Developmental Milestones for Age 1 Year (12 Months)

☐ Crawls on hands and knees.
☐ Pulls to standing position.
☐ Walks around furniture or crib while holding on.
☐ Drinks from a cup.
☐ Waves bye-bye and play peek-a-boo and patty-cake.
☐ Picks up small objects with thumb and index finger.
☐ Holds out arms and legs while being dressed.
☐ Puts objects into container.
☐ Stacks two blocks.
☐ Uses five to six words.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ Cannot stand when supported.
□ Does not crawl.
□ Does not learn to use gestures, such as waving or shaking head.
□ Does not point to objects or pictures.
□ Does not search for objects that are hidden while he or she watches.
□ Drags one side of body while crawling (for over one month).
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had.
□ Says no single words (“mama” or “dada”).



Developmental Milestones for Age 2 Years (24 Months)

☐ Uses two to three word sentences.
☐ Recognizes familiar pictures.
☐ Carries an object while walking.
☐ Plays independently.
☐ Enjoys imitating parents.
☐ Identifies hair, eyes, ears, and nose by pointing.
☐ Builds a tower of four blocks.
☐ Shows affection.
☐ Sometimes says “no” when interfered with.
☐ Kicks a ball forward.
☐ Shows sympathy to other children.
☐ Runs well.
☐ Responds to correction.
☐ Takes off open coat or shirt without help.
☐ Walks up and down stairs alone.
☐ Turns pages of picture book one at a time.
☐ Follows two-part instructions.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ By 15 months, does not seem to know the function of common household objects (brush, telephone, bell).
□ Cannot push a wheeled toy by age 2.
□ Cannot walk by 18 months.
□ Does not follow simple instructions by age 2.
□ Does not imitate actions or words by the end of this period.
□ Does not speak at least 15 words.
□ Does not use two-word sentences by age 2.
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had.
□ Fails to develop a mature heel-toe walking pattern after several months of walking, or walks only on toes.

 

Developmental Milestones for Age 3 Years (36 Months)

☐ Rides a tricycle.
☐ Repeats common rhymes.
☐ Names at least one color correctly.
☐ Uses toilet.
☐ Helps with simple household tasks.
☐ Opens door by turning knob.
☐ Climbs on play equipment, ladders, slide.
☐ Scribbles with circular motion.
☐ Plays with other children.
☐ Stands on one foot without support.
☐ Draws or copies vertical lines.
☐ Speaks and is understood most of the time.
☐ Plays a role in pretend games.
☐ Dresses self with help.
☐ Walks up and down stairs alternating feet.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ Cannot build a tower of more than four blocks.
□ Cannot communicate in short phrases.
□ Cannot copy a circle by age 3.
□ Difficulty manipulating small objects.
□ Does not understand simple instructions.
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had.
□ Extreme difficulty separating from mother or primary caregiver.
□ Frequent falling and difficulty with stairs.
□ Limited interest in toys.
□ Little interest in other children.
□ No involvement in “pretend” play.
□ Persistent drooling or very unclear speech.
□ Poor eye contact.
 

Developmental Milestones for Age 4 Years (48 Months)

□  Interested in new experiences.
□  Cooperates with other children.
□  Plays “Mom” or “Dad”.
□  Increasingly inventive in fantasy play.
□  Dresses and undresses.
□  Negotiates solutions to conflicts.
□  Imagines that many unfamiliar images may be “monsters”.
□  Often cannot tell the difference between fantasy and reality.
□  Correctly names some colors.
□  Understands the concept of counting and may know a few numbers.
□  Begins to have a clearer sense of time.
□  Follows three-part commands.
□  Recalls parts of a story.
□  Understands the concepts of “same” and “different”.
□  Engages in fantasy play.
□  Has mastered some basic rules of grammar.
□  Speaks in sentences of five to six words.
□  Speaks clearly enough for strangers to understand.
□  Tells stories.
□  Hops and stands on one foot up to five seconds.
□  Goes upstairs and downstairs without support.
□  Throws ball overhand.
□  Catches bounced ball most of the time.
□  Moves forward and backward with agility.
□  Copies square shapes.
□  Draws a person with two to four body parts.
□  Uses scissors.
□  Draws circles and squares.
□  Begins to copy some capital letters.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ Cannot copy a circle.
□ Cannot grasp a crayon between thumb and fingers.
□ Cannot jump in place.
□ Cannot ride a tricycle.
□ Cannot stack four blocks.
□ Cannot throw a ball overhand.
□ Doesn’t engage in fantasy play.
□ Doesn’t respond to people outside the family.
□ Doesn’t use “me” and “you” correctly.
□ Doesn’t use sentences of more than three words.
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had.
□ Has difficulty scribbling.
□ Ignores other children.
□ Lashes out without any self-control when angry or upset.
□ Resists dressing, sleeping, using the toilet.
□ Shows no interest in interactive games.
□ Still clings or cries whenever parents leave.
 

Developmental Milestones for Age 5 Years (60 Months)

□  Wants to please friends.
□  Wants to be like her friends.
□  More likely to agree to rules.
□  Likes to sing, dance, and act.
□  Shows more independence and may even visit a next-door neighbor by herself.
□  Aware of gender.
□  Able to distinguish fantasy from reality.
□  Can count 10 or more objects.
□  Correctly names at least four colors.
□  Better understands the concept of time.
□  Knows about things used every day in the home (money, food, appliances).
□  Recalls part of a story.
□  Speaks sentences of more than five words.
□  Uses future tense.
□  Tells longer stories.
□  Says name and address.
□  Stands on one foot for 10 seconds or longer.
□  Hops, somersaults.
□  Swings, climbs.
□  May be able to skip.
□  Copies triangle and other shapes.
□  Draws person with body.
□  Prints some letters.
□  Dresses and undresses without help.
□  Uses fork, spoon, and (sometimes) a table knife.
□  Usually cares for own toilet needs.

 

Alert your child's doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible development delay for this age range:

□ Acts extremely aggressively
□ Acts extremely fearful or timid
□ Avoids or seems aloof with other children and adults
□ Can’t correctly give her first and last name
□ Can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality
□ Cannot brush her teeth efficiently
□ Cannot build a tower of six to eight blocks
□ Cannot understand two-part commands using prepositions (“Put the doll on the bed, and get the ball u
□ Cannot wash and dry her hands
□ Doesn’t engage in a variety of activities
□ Doesn’t express a wide range of emotions
□ Doesn’t talk about her daily activities and experiences
□ Doesn’t use plurals or past tense properly when speaking
□ Experiences a dramatic loss of skills he or she once had
□ Has trouble eating, sleeping or using the toilet
□ Has trouble taking off clothing
□ Is easily distracted and unable to concentrate on any single activity for more than five minutes
□ Is unable to separate from parents without major protest
□ Rarely uses fantasy or imitation in play
□ Refuses to respond to people in general, or responds only superficially
□ Seems uncomfortable holding a crayon
□ Seems unhappy or sad much of the time
□ Seems unusually passive
□ Shows little interest in playing with other children

 Parents are reminded that the checklist above is a guideline.